Fondant and Matchsticks: Bee Hive Winter Preparations

Tub with fondant sitting on crown board.
Tub with fondant sitting on crown board.

This blog takes the reader through using Ambrosia fondant as a winter feed.  The blog briefly looks at ventilation with matchsticks.Read More »

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Varroa Mite Control Part 3: Second Tin of Apiguard

4. Bees busy on the newly made comb. This was a surprise (although it shouldn’t have been) the bees were building comb between the crown board and the top of the frame. This was because of the gap created by the eke.

After two weeks since the first tin of apiguard was placed in the hive, it is time to put in the second tin.Read More »

Varroa Mite Control Part 2: Applying Bee Medicine

Apiguard
Apiguard

Following-on from my earlier post,  I will now show the reader how to apply Apiguard which is a bee medicine.  Apiguard comes in the form of a can that sits on top of the brood frames.  Because of the height of the can, above 20mm an eke is required to raise the height between the brood box and the crown board.

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Varroa Mite Control Part 1: Building an Eke


In England, like most places in the world (except Australia!) colonies of honeybees are infested with the varroa mite.  This causes a lot a harm to the bees because Varroa mites feed off the bodily fluids of adult, pupal and larval honey bees, and may carry viruses that are particularly damaging to the bees (e.g., deformed wings, and IAPV), and accordingly they have been implicated in colony collapse disorder.  The varroa mite cannot be eradicated but it can be controlled.

The medicine I will be using for my hives is called Apiguard and it comes in a can which you place on top of the frames in the brood box.  The bees crawl over the medicine in the can and the mites fall from the bees.  To accommodate the can on top of the brood box frames, a space needs to be created.  The eke, I am going to show you how to build create this space.

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Swarm of Bees: Progress Report

Bees cleaning the comb

The collected swarm has been in their hive 2 weeks.  On my first hive inspection (Tuesday) the bees had akwardly built comb in a gap between the wall of the hive and the frame.  This had to be removed because it would impede future hive inspections.  Nonetheless, the bees had made great progress, drawing comb in five of the ten frames.  The queen is laying; there are eggs and larvae in the brood box which is a great sign!

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